Ferrari

About Ferrari

With so many elements to take into consideration, it’s hard to determine what makes a car brand the best in the business. However, there is one name that will constantly pop up in debate and that is the brand of Ferrari. Ferrari has and always will be associated with the most ambitious vehicles ever produced, some which are too fast and too classy for the road.

History

Enzo Ferrari initially founded a company known as Scuderia Ferrari in 1929 and it was meant to only produce race cars, not road cars for mass production. For the early years the company continued to successfully produce and race in Alfa Romeo until the Second World War.

During the war the company became known as SEFAC or Scuderia Enzo Ferrari Auto Corse. During this time it did produce a single race car, the Tipo 815, despite the restrictions during the time. The company then moved to Maranello by 1943 and officially opened its doors as Ferrari by 1947.

That was the same year that the company released its first road car, the 125 S. Since then the company has focused on producing high end racing vehicles while also supplementing less powerful road car versions of their most powerful products.

By 1969 the company reached an agreement with Fiat, which took a 50% stake with the company. The sudden increase in finances helped Ferrari boost new model production and this is what brought about the now famous 550 Maranello, as well as the re-engineered Fiat Dino.

Ferrari lost its founder in 1988, after the launch of the company’s then-fastest vehicle yet, the Ferrari F40. The F40 is arguably the most iconic car ever released by the company.

In 2014, Ferrari’s parent company Fiat merged with the Chrysler Corporation. During this move Ferrari was released and now functions as an independent brand.

Iconic Cars

The most iconic car in Ferrari’s lineup is the F40, the last car that the founder oversaw before his death that same year. It was the company’s fastest car at the time and it focused entirely on high performance, eliminating the dashboard radio, carpets, and other accessories.

Then there’s the Ferrari Enzo (the F60) which was released in honor of the founder who recently passed away. This high-end vehicle only saw 399 units produced and all of them were available only through invitations. This was Ferrari’s send-off to their loyal customers who previously bought Ferrari vehicles, although one unit was donated to the Vatican.

Innovations

The Ferrari brand has been reluctant to innovate in terms of automotive advancements and this is because the brand focuses on performance and speed instead of mass appeal. The major innovations brought by Ferrari are in regards to its aerodynamic designs and how it re-thinks vehicular weight to optimize speed and control on the road.