Pontiac GTO 0-60 Times

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TrimEngineDrive TypeTrans.0-601/4 MileMpg EPA C/H/ObservedSource

2006 Pontiac GTO

SLP 455 Bobcat Coupe6.0L V8RWD6M4.6 sec13.2 sec @ 110 mph----/----/15 mpgCar and Driver

2005 Pontiac GTO

Coupe6.0L V8RWD6M4.8 sec13.3 sec @ 107 mph15/23/14 mpgCar and Driver
Coupe6.0L V8RWD6M4.7 sec13.3 sec @ 105.9 mph15/23/---- mpgMotor Trend
Coupe6.0L V8RWD6M5.0 sec13.3 sec @ 107.5 mph15/23/---- mpgMotor Trend
Coupe6.0L V8RWD6M5.1 sec13.5 sec @ 108 mph15/23/---- mpgMotor Week
MTI Coupe7.5L V8RWD6M4.9 sec12.6 sec @ 130.1 mph----/----/---- mpgMotor Trend

2004 Pontiac GTO

Coupe5.7L V8RWD6M5.3 sec14.0 sec @ 102 mph16/26/22 mpgCar and Driver
Coupe5.7L V8RWD6M5.3 sec13.62 sec @ 104.78 mph16/26/---- mpgMotor Trend
Coupe5.7L V8RWD4A5.4 sec13.85 sec @ 101.41 mph14/19/---- mpgMotor Trend
Coupe5.7L V8RWD6M5.4 sec13.9 sec @ 103.6 mph16/26/16 mpgRoad & Track
Lingenfelter Coupe5.7L V8RWD6M4.3 sec12.6 sec @ 113.5 mph----/----/---- mpgMotor Trend

1969 Pontiac GTO

Judge Coupe7.5L V8RWD4M6.4 sec13.9 sec @ 100.5 mph----/----/---- mpgMotor Trend

1968 Pontiac GTO

428 / Royal Bobcat Coupe7.0L V8RWD3A5.2 sec13.8 sec @ 104 mph----/----/---- mpgCar and Driver
400 Ram-Air Coupe6.6L V8RWD4M6.5 sec14.45 sec @ 98.2 mph----/----/---- mpgMotor Trend
400 Ram-Air Coupe6.6L V8RWD3A7.3 sec15.93 sec @ 88.32 mph----/----/---- mpgMotor Trend

1967 Pontiac GTO

400 / Royal Bobcat Coupe6.6L V8RWD4M4.9 sec14.21 sec @ 102.97 mph----/----/---- mpgMotor Trend
400 / Royal Bobcat Coupe6.6L V8RWD3A5.2 sec14.09 sec @ 101 mph----/----/---- mpgMotor Trend

1964 Pontiac Tempest Le Mans GTO

Convertible6.4L V8RWD4M6.9 sec15.1 sec @ 96 mph----/----/---- mpgCar and Driver
Convertible6.4L V8RWD4M7.7 sec15.8 sec @ 93 mph----/----/12.9 mpgMotor Trend
Coupe6.4L V8RWD4M4.6 sec13.1 sec @ 115 mph----/----/---- mpgCar and Driver

About Pontiac GTO

If you’re a gearhead or a collector, you immediately think about the classic GTOs from the 1960s and early 1970s which were the golden age of muscle cars.

Those who need a good used car may see the GTO from 2004 to 2006 as a bargain. Its low price is due to the bland styling and the idiosyncratic interior, but that engine does offer a nice surprise.

There are several versions as to how the GTO from Pontiac got its name. One legend has it that it was outright stolen from the fabulous Ferrari 250 GTO, as its name was an acronym for Gran Turismo Omologato. But then Ferrari didn’t patent the GTO name in North America, so DeLorean who was its chief engineer took the name. He GTO started out as an option for the Tempest, so supposedly it meant “Grand Tempest Option.

Of course, a lot of people who first saw the 1964 Pontiac Tempest LeMans GTO fell in love with it, and many just thought it meant “the great one”. In conversation, the classic iteration was called the “goat” even during the time, and despite the fact that Pontiac advertising was calling it the GTO Tiger.

The Classics

Pontiac GTO 0-60

2004 Pontiac GTO

If you’ve got time, try to download a copy of the song “Little G.T.O.” by Ronnie and the Daytonas. This song sold a million copies in 1964, and it says a lot about how well the car was received.

The car was actually violated GM production guidelines at the time regarding engine displacement, but DeLorean and his team took advantage of a loophole in the policy because it was first brought out as an option for the Pontiac Tempest. The bigwigs at the company first thought that it would sell just 5,000 units, but they actually sold 32,000 that first year.

With the first 1964 GTO, you were able to get a 6L V8 rated at 325 HP with an option for “Tri-Power” carburetion that gave you a total of 348 HP. It was affordable and it was built for power. But except for some minor differences (a hood with 2 small dummy air scoops, subtle emblems, and a black-finish grille), it looked like a regular Tempest. So it was a secret rebel, since the traffic cops couldn’t tell that there was a minster under the hood. It was a feature beloved of those with lead feet.

Minor tweaks were made for the 1965 version, and its sales more than doubled from the previous year at more than 75,000 units. By then, it would set off the muscle car craze in America, and its principles would be imitated by competitors and even by other GM cars.

The GTO cars became standalone models in 1966. Together with the 1967 version, these GTOs are considered the 1st generation of the GTO, technically speaking. These are collectibles as well, especially when you get one with all the options. Convertibles are also rarer than the others.

The GTO was the Motor Trend Car of the Year, but the brand was losing market share due to the influx of so many competitors and imitators. So now we come to the Judge option. Introduced in 1969 and available until 1971, it is now considered the most collectible GTO of them all. It offered Ram Air III engine, wider tires on Rally II wheels without trim rings, and a Hurst shifter with a unique T-shaped handle. There were also various decals and a rear spoiler. The 1970 GTO Judge offered a Ram Air IV as an option.

Today, any Pontiac GTO is considered a classic, as long as you don’t get the detuned models from 1973 and 1974. The 1970 Judge with the Ram Air IV will be the most expensive of them all. Even if it’s not in top condition, it will cost about $47,000. With original colors and featuring the proper Judge stripes and Ram Air IV badges, the price goes up to an average of $86,000.

And what if it’s in pristine and perfectly restored condition? With the Hurst 4-speed, we’re talking about more than $200,000.

Used GTOs

The GTO made its second appearance in 2004 to 2006. It only lasted 3 years, since unlike its ancestor its exterior styling was quite blah. And the starting price was set at more than $30K, which definitely violated the “affordable muscle” philosophy of the original.

As a used car, the depreciated prices are now more tolerable, so you can get a good bargain. The engine performances are excellent and the speeds are blazingly fast. The 2004 models with the 350-HP LS1 V8 with the 365 pound feet of torque took 5 seconds to get to 60 mph, and 14 seconds to finish a quarter mile. The 2005 and 2006 models with the 6L V8 rated for 400 HP and 400 pound-feet of torque took less than 5 seconds to get to 60 mph, and a quarter mile only took 13.3 seconds.

Just remember, that the drawbacks of the modern GTO include weak brakes, too much body roll, and sluggish handling. Still, you can forgive these drawbacks with the prices and the power you get.

To learn more about Pontiac automobiles, visit the official Pontiac website.

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